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Hubble Spots Flocculent Spiral Galaxy | Astronomy -News.com

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have captured a spectacular image of the spiral galaxy NGC 2775.

This Hubble image shows a flocculent spiral galaxy called NGC 2775. The image was made from separate exposures taken in the visible, ultraviolet and near-infrared regions of the spectrum with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). It is based on data obtained through five filters. The color results from assigning different hues to each monochromatic image associated with an individual filter. Image credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble / J. Lee / PHANGS-HST Team / Judy Schmidt, www.geckzilla.com.

This Hubble image shows a flocculent spiral galaxy called NGC 2775. The image was made from separate exposures taken in the visible, ultraviolet and near-infrared regions of the spectrum with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). It is based on data obtained through five filters. The color results from assigning different hues to each monochromatic image associated with an individual filter. Image credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble / J. Lee / PHANGS-HST Team / Judy Schmidt, www.geckzilla.com.

NGC 2775 is located approximately 67 million light-years away in the northern constellation of Cancer.

The galaxy was discovered on December 19, 1783 by the German-born British astronomer William Herschel.

It belongs to the Antilia-Hydra Cloud of galaxies and is the main member of a small group of galaxies called the NGC 2775 group.

Also known as LEDA 25861 or UGC 4820, NGC 2275 has a diameter of 80,000 light-years and is classified as a flocculent spiral galaxy.

“NGC 2775’s ‘flocculent’ spiral arms indicate that the recent history of star formation of the galaxy has been relatively quiet,” Hubble astronomers said.

“There is virtually no star formation in the central part of the galaxy, which is dominated by an unusually large and relatively empty galactic bulge, where all the gas was converted into stars long ago.”

“Millions of bright, young, blue stars shine in the complex, feather-like spiral arms, interlaced with dark lanes of dust,” they noted.

“Complexes of these hot, blue stars are thought to trigger star formation in nearby gas clouds.”

“The overall feather-like spiral patterns of the arms are then formed by shearing of the gas clouds as the galaxy rotates.”

“The spiral nature of flocculents stands in contrast to the grand design spirals, which have prominent, well defined-spiral arms.”

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